One of my favorite web-based tools for the classroom is EDpuzzle.   When you think about watching a video clip in the classroom, you probably picture something like this:  The teacher starts the video, but occasionally pauses to ask comprehension questions, to make sure students are paying attention, and to draw attention to important points.  Either that, or there is a worksheet full of questions from the video.  The worksheet has the advantage of holding everyone accountable, but loses the laser-pointer effect of the teacher pausing and drawing attention to things as they come up. EDpuzzle moves the video to individual student devices, and embeds questionsRead More →

A tool similar to Symbaloo Lesson Plans is TES Blendspace, which was, as the name implies, originally created for blended learning environments, but is totally applicable to any classroom with access to web-enabled devices.  I recently took a PowerPoint that contained all of the content for a 3 ½ hour session of a grad course I teach and moved it into Blendspace.  Essentially, I chunked the PowerPoint. As students progressed through the Blendspace, they would see a few slides from the PowerPoint in the first box, then a video in another box, some more slides, then a weblink, then a document, then a Padlet toRead More →

There was a time when a teacher who was on the cutting edge of technology was creating all of their lessons on Powerpoint.  While those days are long gone, they may also be returning.  But more about that later.  There are a number of tools available to teachers today that can incorporate an entire lesson.  Some even have the flexibility to allow for either the teacher or the student to determine the pacing of the delivery.  All of the tools in this series have various interactive features to take the static, teacher-centered Powerpoint and turn it into an engaging, student-centered learning experience. Both Microsoft PowerpointRead More →

Microsoft is admittedly playing catch-up to Google in K-12 education, but they are creating some dramatic offerings for leveling the playing field, particularly for students with reading difficulties and ELLs.  Microsoft Learning Tools, originally a part of MS One Note, and now largely available within MS Word (Office 365) as the “Immersive Reader” view, has some terrific features for readers.  As you can see in the video, you have choices for text and background colors, and can adjust not only font but also spacing between words.  The text-to-speech engine works well, and offers decent voices, and adjustable reading rates, all while highlighting each word asRead More →